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I, Ripper, Stephen Hunter’s version of the story of Jack the Ripper, is a bloody good take on the timeless tale. And we mean that in every way

 

StephenHunter (c) Kelly CampbellI,Ripper CVR

 

 

Readers of Stephen Hunter’s three series about the Swagger clan, know he’s a firearms’ savant. In our interview, Steve discusses the Howdah (below), an unusual gun that plays a role in his novel.

 

howdah-side

 

Photo of Stephen Hunter ©Kelly Campbell

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Our next three interviews will take us all over time and geography

  • Sharon Bolton’s Little Black Lies is set in the Falkland Islands in the mid-1990s
  • In The Bomb Maker’s Son, Robert Rotstein stays close to home (at least for us) in L.A.’s Westside, but the story begins during the protests to the Vietnam War
  • Stephen Hunter’s I, Ripper explores unambiguously frightening territory: the mind of Jack the Ripper in late 19th century London.

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In her foreword to the re-publication of Compulsion, Meyer Levin’s remarkable novel based on the 1924 Leopold and Loeb trial in Chicago, Marcia Clark—who knows a thing or two about “Trials
of the Century”—reminds us that almost 60 years after its publication, Levin’s look at the justice system’s role in society continues to ring true

 

Marcia Clark photo by Claudia KuninCompulsion jacket

 

Far from being in any way dated, true-crime trial junkies as well as fans of legal procedurals will find Compulsion as fresh and compelling as anything being written today.

Photo of Marcia Clark ©Claudia Kunin

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In Pleasantville, Attica Locke picks up the story of activist-turned-environmental lawyer Jay Porter, who she introduced to us in her debut thriller, Black Water Rising

 

Attica Locke 2015, credit Jenny Walters Pleasantville jacket

 

In her own words, Attica was thrilled that Pleasantville was published when it was. You see, for the foreseeable future she plans to be otherwise engaged with another writing project: being a writer and producer of the breakout hit Empire, which has just been renewed for its second season.

Photo of Attica Locke ©Jenny Walters

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Who better than Ross Macdonald biographer Tom Nolan to edit what we can only hope is the first of many anthologies of the California noir great’s mysteries for The Library of America?

 

barry book party 011Ross Macdonald jacket

 

Photo of Tom Nolan ©David Strick

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The Glasgow Trilogy—The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, How a Gunman Says Goodbye and The Sudden Arrival of Violence—is a trio of crime fiction tales told from the other side of the law

 

lewis winter howagunmansaysgoodbyesuddenarrival

 

The first installment in Malcolm Mackay’s Glasgow Trilogy, The Necessary Death of Lewis Winter, was shortlisted for the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger Award, the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Award and longlisted for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger for Best Thriller of the Year Award. The second installment, How a Gunman Says Goodbye, won the Deanston Scottish Crime Book of the Year Award at Bloody Scotland in 2013. It’s worth noting that the other nominees for that year’s Deanston Award included Ann Cleeves, Val McDermid, Denise Mina and Ian Rankin.

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This week Speaking of Mysteries takes a break to catch up on its reading

books for SoM

But we’ll be back on Monday April 20 with our next series of interviews:

  • Christopher Brookmyre on Dead Girl Walking, his most recent Jack Parlabane mystery
  • Marsha Clark on her foreword for the new edition of Meyer Levin’s Compulsion from Fig Tree Publishing
  • Tom Nolan makes a return visit to discuss Ross Macdonald: Four Novels of the 1950s, which he edited for The Library of America
  • Attica Locke on Pleasantville, the sequel to her debut novel Black Water Rising.

 

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Exotic doesn’t even begin to describe the setting of The Strangler Vine, M.J. Carter’s debut crime fiction novel: India in the mid-1830’s complete with tiger hunts, bags of jewels and the pursuit of the mysterious Thuggee cult through the jungles and along the Grand Truck Road

 

Miranda Carter_©Roderick Field The Strangler Vine jacket

 

Photo of M.J. Carter ©Roderick Field

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